“Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough, and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos to order, confusion to clarity. It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend.” — Athar Aalam, Employee Relations Manager, Deegit Global Talent Leaders.

I was following an interesting thread started by Nicole Lipkin, Psy.D over in LinkedIn last week. The topic was the impact of gratitude in the workplace, especially when the gratitude comes honestly from an employer. I was feeling a little bittersweet about this because by the time you read this I will have changed employers officially and I liked my previous employer. Once upon a time they used to be more engaged.

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We know our own context but we seldom know a complete context for others; and some of us are prone to a ‘glass is half empty’ frame of mind. Re-frame one’s thinking by focusing on what you have to be grateful for can change everything about context for yourself and for others too.

Sadly in the parting it was made clear that myself and other employees were not apparently valued; that stings a bit. However, we are valued by our client, and that value meant we were asked to stay on with the new company, and so things are looking up for all of us. We will have a new employer and they appear to be sincerely interested in making things a win-win for everyone involved; this is how you do good business.

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Gratitude is free; there is no better value than free in a cost-benefit analysis. Gratitude also has a high rate of return on investment. It is painless, lowers stress, increases productivity, and incurs no costs for shipping, storage or other overhead fees.

The highlight of the LinkedIn discussion, for me at least, was this: “Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough, and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos to order, confusion to clarity. It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend.” It was the comment made by Mr. Athar Aalam. I liked it because it reminded me of something very important.

You can worry about what you don’t have, and miss what you do. We can miss out on so much; people, experiences, critical moments in time, opportunities, because we can make the mistake of taking too much for granted. We think someone will always be there; then one day they’re gone. We worry about one person not appreciating us, we miss another person who does.

We worry about not having wealth, we miss that we have a warm, safe place to sleep and food in the refrigerator and pantry. We worry about comparing favorably to others, we overdevelop our ability to see our weaknesses and become blind to our strengths. We worry about trying to keep up with others, we don’t notice that we all start out in different places and on less than even playing fields.

 

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Gratitude broadens our perspective, allows us to gather our strength, find our courage, some hope, and our path out of anxiety, depression, and despair.

And welcome to a new weekly feature here at Post Modern Apocalyptic Failure, Gratitude Tuesdays, because there is nothing better for improving one’s outlook regardless of where it might be, than noting what you are grateful for in your life. There will be no particular order; I just think there could stand to be more gratitude out there in the world so I am putting forth my own contribution.

This week, my gratitude goes out for Dr. Lipkin for this thread:

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6405092328578576384/

And to Mr. Athar Aalam for his awesome quote. You can see it in the comment section.

***Special thanks to Athar Aalam for permission to use his quote.